April Book Reviews Part 1! @JacqBiggar @Sandra_Cox @teagangeneviene @pat_garcia#IARTG #ASMSG #WritingCommunity #bookreviews #mustread #indieauthors

Turn The Light On

by Pat Garcia

“Turn the Light On” is an unusual short story with a lot of twists. Della is a successful career woman who has been meeting a man for dinner. Yet, they don’t sit at the same dinner table or speak except through book passages. None of that matters because she is drawn to him. A well-written romantic story full of mystery and intrigue. This is a story where I could never have guessed the outcome, and I thoroughly enjoyed that!

Dead of Winter: Journey 3, The Fever Field

by Teagan Riordain Geneviene

This is the third installment of Dead of Winter, and so far, my favorite. I loved getting to know the youngest of the Deae Matres, Zasha. She has a passionate personality that drew me into her part of the story. The Deae Matres were searching for answers, which lead them to the Fever Field or a graveyard. Then the story returned to Emlyn, and I couldn’t read fast enough to find out what happened to her. I’m loving this story and can’t wait to see where the next journey goes.

Queen of Diamonds

by Sandra Cox

“Queen of Diamonds” was a lot of fun and kept me on the edge of my seat. A best-selling author, Logan, and his assistant, Kendall, spent three years working together, yet Logan didn’t really know her. Kendall had a secret life that no one knew about. She went beyond what most would do for their family. That path led her to a secret life that was completely opposite of what people thought of her. It made the book a page-turner to see what would happen next. The interaction between Kendall and Logan was entertaining, but I really loved the relationship that developed between Logan and Kendall’s family. A quick but satisfying read that kept me guessing how it would resolve itself until the very end. If you love suspenseful romance with a strong female character, this book is for you.

The Lady Said No: An Augustus Grant Mystery- Book 1 (An Augustus Grant Mystery-Prequel)

by Jacquie Biggar

“The Lady Said No” is a murder mystery, with some romance, set in Kentucky in the 1950s. Detective Augustus Grant, Gus, is sent to investigate what appeared to be a suicide of a prominent horse breeder. Rebecca, the woman Gus had left behind to become a detective, works for this family. When Gus realizes the death wasn’t self-inflicted, Rebecca is on the list of suspects. This sets up a nice inner battle between his heart and head. I loved the setting, horses, and era, although the time frame made the role of a single mother more of a struggle. I admired Rebecca’s independence and her ability to support her child alone. Then there was something charming about the Detective, and it was beneficial that most underestimated him. This is a quick read that kept me guessing until the exciting end. I really enjoyed this and hope there will be more Detective Grant books coming. I can easily recommend this book, especially if you like a cozy mystery.

I only post my 4 & 5-star reviews. If I don’t like a book, I won’t finish it. It doesn’t feel right leaving a review in that case, but I have been known to email the author:) Life is too short not to enjoy every book you read!

Had a wonderful vacation, and I’m happy to be back! I shared a couple of pictures on Instagram and Facebook:)

Embrace your inner child by reading a good book! 🙂 D. L. Finn

Dolphin’s Cave Book Reviews #IARTG #ASMSG #WritingCommunity #indiebooks #ChildrenBook #YABook #Fantasy #reviews

I released my YA/middle grade “Dolphin’s Cave” at the end of 2020. I had a couple of blogs leading up to it and announced its release. Then, I got busy and didn’t do much after that.

So, I thought a blog would be in order to share what others are saying about this book.

Here are the last three reviews are taken directly from Amazon:

Cathleen Townsend

Coral has always wanted to go to Hawaii, ever since her parents died there when she was only a kid. A recurring dream has visited her every night since—she rides a dolphin to an underwater cave. Only there will she find the answers she seeks about her parents’ death. But she always wakes up before she discovers what really happened.

Shortly before her sixteenth birthday, she’s thrilled to learn her aunt and some friends are taking her to Hawaii for Christmas. Coral loves the ocean, and she doesn’t get to see it very often, living as she does in a desert near Reno, Nevada.

But once they arrive in Hawaii, disquieting events steal some of her joy. Her aunt has met a new guy—nothing wrong with that—but this one seems to be nothing but a weasel. When Coral’s aunt nearly gets run over in the street, he merely stands there and watches. And everywhere they go, people seem to be taking their picture. Not just catching them in group photos, but specifically shooting photos of them, as if they were celebrities or something.

But then matters turn dangerous. Her aunt is hospitalized, the result of a near-fatal car crash. Coral can’t afford to ignore all the strange things going on anymore, or some of them may never make it home…

***

Dolphin’s Cave is a YA coming-of-age story that should appeal to fans of teen adventures, especially ones who love dolphins.


JanS
Fifteen-year-old Coral is a typical teenager except she’d lost her parents at the age of eight and lives with an aunt. Oh, and she has this recurring dream every night where she rides on a dolphin’s back to another world that can only be accessed from deep within the ocean. Try as she may, she can never reach the end of the dream and enter the golden city. Then a trip to Hawaii with her aunt and family friends changes everything. Coral is convinced that going to the place where her parents’ plane went down will bring her answers. And it does, but not what she is expecting. This YA has a bit of everything from spies and murder to magic, and budding young love. This author did a fantastic job of world-building. Once Coral enters the Golden City, or Mearth, the descriptive writing put me inside the book with the characters and I ooohed and ahhed over the amazing architecture, dragons, strange food, and shape-shifting animals. This story will spark the imagination of any reader. It is a well-written fantasy with a touch of realism.

March Book Reviews Part 1! @PTLPerrin @ColleenChesebro @teagangeneviene @harmony_kent #IARTG #ASMSG #WritingCommunity #BookReviews #WhatToRead #MustRead

Slices of Soul

by Harmony Kent

“Slice of Soul” is a beautiful collection of poetry that tugged on my emotions. There is a story weaved into the poems that had a memoir feel to it. Each section was a narrative of the author progressing through periods of her life. So many feelings arose, but each one felt authentic and direct from the soul. I really connected to the ocean or guitar passages but appreciated each part of the journey. This is a book I will be reading again.

Dead of Winter: Journey 2, Penllyn
by Teagan Riordain Geneviene

I loved the first journey and had been waiting for the second installment. The story begins where it left off with 12-year-old Emlyn, who lived in repressive religious times with powers she had to hide. The story was told from two points of view, Emlyn’s and Zasha. It gives an encompassing view of two strong young women. One can embrace herself, Zasha, and Emlyn, who can’t. The images and details paint a cold and cruel world Emlyn lives in with her family. I’m all in and rooting for Emlyn and Zasha. I can’t wait for the next journey and highly recommend “Dead of Winter.” Start from the beginning you don’t want to miss anything!

The Heart Stone Chronicles (The Swamp Fairy, #1)

by Colleen M. Chesebro

“The Heart Stone Chronicles” is a magical read for upper middle grade and the young at heart. Fourteen-year-old Abby is in the Chicago foster system after her drug-addicted father abandons her. She is sent to her only living relative, her father’s sister, who lived in rural Florida. The story began for me when she set foot in her new town. I fell in love with the area, wondering if I’d like to live there. I was glad her aunt turned out to be nice, and Abby made a friend right away. Then Abby finds out she’s inherited swamp land from her mother, who had died a few years before, and someone has put in an offer to buy it. The relationship between Abby and her aunt was heartwarming, and I liked her new best friend, Savannah. The local bullies seemed realistic, and Mr. Cobb, who had to have Abby’s swamp, no matter what it took. That was a bit terrifying how far he’d go. My favorite part of the story was Abby’s gift to communicate with animals. Never ridden a horse, Abby’s ability allowed her and the horse to bond, so she could easily ride him. I could almost feel the wind blowing my hair as Abby rode across the field on her horse. Meeting the swamp fairies was beautifully illustrated and captivating. This story was well-paced, with a gentle reminder about the importance of nature that I appreciated. I recommend this to all who love fairies, which I do. I’m hoping there will be another book to continue exploring with Abby and the fairies.

Terra’s Anthem: The TetraSpehere Series: Book 4 (TetraSphere)

by P.T.L. Perrin

I have thoroughly enjoyed this YA series. The fate of the world depends on four teenagers, and it’s been a pleasure watching them grow, and relationships develop. Told in the first person through the four teens gives a good insight into what they are going through. There are many twists and turns in this final book, and when I think they are safe, something happens. There’s plenty of action in this sci-fi tale with some romance mixed in, and I fell in love with the newest addition in their group. The alien community has good and bad, or the same as the humans, which deepened the storyline. One alien is particularly bad and extremely easy to root against. The detail in descriptions is amazing and makes it effortless to picture the surroundings. The ending was satisfying, with another twist weaved in. If you love a good sci-fi YA story, this is definitely for you. I highly recommend this series, but make sure you begin with the first book—you don’t want to miss anything.

I only post my 4 & 5-star reviews. If I don’t like a book, I won’t finish it. It doesn’t feel right leaving a review in that case, but I have been known to email the author:) Life is too short not to enjoy every book you read!

Embrace your inner child by reading a good book! 🙂 D. L. Finn

Final winter book reviews!

I’m working on my”Currently Reading” list over on Goodreads. Right now, I’m reading: The Terra Debacle: Prisoners at Area 51 by Marcha A. Fox! Here are my latest books read:

The Improbable Journeys of Billy Battles: Book 2, Finding Billy Battles Trilogy 

by Ronald E. Yates

This is the second book of the “Finding Billy Battles” trilogy and begins where “An Account of Peril, Transgression, and Redemption” left off. While the first book centered on the wild west, this book opens with Billy taking a trip to the far east after his beloved wife dies. The journey on the SS China is one of my favorite parts of the series, so far. Seeing 1894 through his eyes is riveting. I could easily picture each place the ship stopped including Oahu before it was built up into the tropical city it is now. On the boat he meets a German Baroness, Katharina who pulls Billy into her story and her life. When Billy reaches his destination (after parting with the Baroness and dealing with pirates) he reconnects with old friends. Here, he’s pulled into a battle between the French and the locals. Finally, it is time for Billy to make his way home and be reunited with his family and daughter. That doesn’t last though, when he is requested to go back to the Philippines for Katharina’s brother and they become involved in the Spanish-American war. This is a part of history I admit to knowing little about: the colonization of the Philippines or the French Indonesia. Mr. Yates has not only detailed it but made it interesting. Although, this isn’t just about wars and history, there are very intriguing relationships that develop including another romance for Billy! This is a stand-alone book, I wouldn’t miss reading the first Billy Battles. I highly recommend this series if you love a good historical fiction with a lot of amazing details or just love a well told tale–this is both!


The Hat

By C.S. Boyack

I loved this fantasy novella by Mr. Boyack! Lizzie St. Laurent loses not only her grandmother and her place to live but is left without any mementos to remember her by. This is when Lizzie decides to grab a box from the truck loaded with her grandmother’s things and leaves. This quick decision changes her life. She soon finds herself with a living hat and a family history she was unaware of. The conversations between Lizzie and the hat had me laughing out loud. When a baby is kidnapped, the hat suggests Lizzie and the hat work together to find him. The concept of an inanimate object being alive is intriguing to me and “The Hat” accomplishes this well. This had everything I enjoy in a story, action, humor, depth, and unusual characters—plus, who wouldn’t want a talking hat with magical powers? I highly recommend this if you love fantasy and paranormal themes– or are looking for something different. I’m hoping there will be more stories with Lizzie and the hat!


June the Prune and Lady Bird: Cancer Stinks! Kids and Pets Cracking the Power Code 

by Gracie Bradford

This is a children’s book that tells the story of ten-year-old June who lives with her brother and dysfunctional mother. She finds a puppy, Lady Bird, and the children take care of it until it finally becomes a part of their family–and her best friend. June is an A student who is thrust into the role of caretaker more often than she should be. Luckily, her grandma is involved, or G-Mom, and that helps the children to have more stability and love. Her mother marries and brings an uncaring stepfather and four unfriendly steps siblings into the house. But, June gets an amazing trip with her grandmother and brother across Europe–where the kids bring joy to the tour group. Unfortunately, right after is when June gets sick and ends up fighting cancer in the hospital. This part of the book is very emotional and drew me deep into the story. I was extremely invested into June’s outcome and her bravery through an unthinkable situation for any child going through cancer treatments. This is a book I’d recommend for kids and adults to read—and to understand.


 

Embrace your inner child and read a book! D.L. Finn