September Book Reviews Part 1! @sgc58 @WordDreams #WritingCommunity #BookReviews #WhatToRead

Laws of Nature Book CoverLife is Like a Mosaic by Sally Cronin Book Cover

Life is like a Mosaic: Random fragments in harmony

by Sally Cronin

“Life is like a Mosaic” is a book of poetry that offers images to add to the journey. I have always loved the mixture of pictures and words, and this collection is a delightful blend of that. I like how honest and insightful the poems are with various subjects that take daily life into a deeper realm. Here are a few of my favorite lines: “defies monochrome hues/with a splash of colour/softening their/harshness,” “Clarity as the memories cascade/tumbling down the precipice of time/as if the floodgates have opened,” “The moon/hangs in the sky/lighting the earth at night,” “Sit/serene/with wise thought/and let them drift,” “Nature’s young frolic in the sun/under blossom topped tree/celebrating/new life,” and “Washed up/are words that haunt.” A thoughtful collection that I can highly recommend for poetry lovers.


Laws of Nature (Dawn of Humanity Book 2)

by Jacqui Murray

I loved the first book of “Dawn of Humanity” and had been eager to read this story. This engaging read followed two groups, split apart in the last book, trying to find each other. The most interesting was the character following these two groups and the one who joined up with him. When reading, I was completely drawn into the story down to saying “ick” when they ate their raw meat or sucked the marrow out of a bone. The attention to detail and amount of research is amazing, including how they communicated, groomed, interacted, and traveled. Lucy’s group shows an inclusion that is inspiring and relevant, especially in modern times. I appreciated a strong female character who applied logic to dangerous situations. I can’t wait for the next book and highly recommend “Laws of Nature!”


Born in a Treacherous time (Dawn of Humanity)

by Jacqui Murray

I have read and loved the Crossroad Series by Ms. Murray and have been eager to read this series. When the second book came out, I rushed to get started. Lucy and her journey immediately pulled me in. After leaving her first group, she finds a home and a new pair mate. Within this group, there is jealousy and distrust, but the most important thing is their survival. The amount of research and thought that went into this story amazed me. I could easily imagine how it was to live in their prehistorical times. I’m very glad that we found a way to control fire and cook our food. Their eating habits and being scavengers were so detailed and well-written that they made me shudder as they tore into their meal. Although everyone didn’t appreciate Lucy, her strength kept her and those around her going. As the group shifts and changes, so does the world around them. I dove right into the second book when I finished this one. I highly recommend this!


I only post my 4 & 5-star reviews. If I don’t like a book, I won’t finish it. It doesn’t feel right leaving a review in that case, but I have been known to email the author:) Life is too short not to enjoy every book you read!

Embrace that sweet inner child by reading a good book! D. L. Finn

“Books That Changed Me–2021 Spring Edition” @JanSikes3 @sgc58 @TPolen6 @MaeClair1 #IARTG #ASMSG #WritingCommunity #WhatToRead #MustRead #IndieBooks #BooksThatChangedMe

Spring has arrived with the return of the birds and wildflowers pushing through the icy soil. It’s a time of change and rebirth as winter slowly fades away. This makes a perfect time to read. I’ve had a good start to reading this year—26 books and counting!

As you know, if I don’t like a book, I won’t read it. There have been a few books I tried to read more than once. I couldn’t get into the story and finally give up.

So, I enjoy all the books I make to the end, but some of them leave a lasting impression on me. They’ve held me captive from the opening paragraph, made me think, or opened my eyes to something new. These are the books that I highlight here in “Books That Changed Me,” and will continue using the author’s blurb over my review.

Here is my 2021 Spring list in no particular order:

I loved the entire Hode Hill Series, but this last one was my favorite. “Eventide” offered everything I appreciate in a story which includes a haunted house, graveyard, and mystery. But that wasn’t all! There were fantastic characters, intriguing relationships to root for all presented in a dual timeline.

Eventide (Hode’s Hill #3)

by Mae Clair

BLURB:

The darkness is coming . . .

The old house near Hode’s Hill, Pennsylvania is a place for Madison Hewitt to start over—to put the trauma of her husband’s murder, and her subsequent breakdown, behind her. She isn’t bothered by a burial plot on the property, or the mysterious, sealed cistern in the basement. Not at first. Even the presence of cold spots and strange odors could be fabrications of her still troubled mind. But how to explain her slashed tires, or the ominous messages that grow ever more threatening?

Convinced the answer lies in the past, Madison delves into the history of the home’s original owners, only to discover the origin of a powerful evil. An entity that may be connected to a series of gruesome attacks that have left police baffled. No matter where she turns—past or present—terror lingers just a step away, spurred on by a twisted obsession that can only be satisfied through death…

*****

This YA story is set in the future where there is a very strong divide between the have and have nots. It wasn’t simply some people living better than others; they used the have nots body parts for their own improvement. It chills me to think that our society could become so self-centered and greedy that this would be possible.

Subject A36 (The Colony #1)

by Teri Polen

BLURB:

If genetic engineering could guarantee you and your family perfect health and unparalleled beauty, would you pay top dollar for it? Would you kill for it?

Residents of the Colony would. And do.

Only the Insurgents can stop them.

Seventeen-year-old Asher Solomon is a premier operative with the Insurgents. He and his team have rescued countless hostages, saving them from painful deaths in Colony labs as desirable genetic traits are stripped from their bodies.

He’s also suffered more losses than anyone should have to.

Then Asher gets intel that might give his people the upper hand. The Colony is searching for Subject A36. If the Insurgents determine the subject’s identity first, they might be able to turn the tide of the war.

Asher and his team embark on their riskiest mission ever, and the stakes have never been higher. But even if he survives the physical dangers, the devastating secrets he uncovers might destroy him.

*****

The perfect blend of short stories, poems, and images made this a great read. But what drew me in further was I felt like I was reading about people I knew. There were heartbreaks and humor that carefully engaged my emotions. What I ended up with after reading this collection, there’s hope in everyday situations.

Life is Like a Bowl of Cherries: Sometimes Bitter, Sometimes Sweet 

by Sally Cronin

BLURB:

Life is Like a Bowl of Cherries: Sometimes Bitter, Sometimes Sweet is a collection of short stories with scattered poetry, reflecting the complexities of life, love and loss.

The stories in the collection dip into the lives of men and women who are faced with an ‘event’ that is challenging and in some cases life changing.

Even something as straightforward as grocery shopping online can be frustrating, and a DNA test produces surprise results, the past reaches out to embrace the present, and a gardening assistant is an unlikely grief counsellor. Romance is not always for the faint-hearted and you are never too old for love. Random acts of kindness have far reaching consequences and some people discover they are on a lucky streak. There are those watching over us who wish us well, and those in our lives who wish us harm.

*****

A bonus short story with the theme to never to give up! Plus, it’s written from a horse’s point of view. How could I not like it?

Satin & Cinders

by Jan Sikes

BLURB:

A wild black stallion has cautiously watched a beautiful white mare, from the safety of the forest for many years. He longs to be with her, and ventures close to the barn nightly to communicate with her. They share their deepest desires and secrets. Now it is winter, and the rest of the wild herd has moved on, but the stallion stays. He cannot stand the thought of being so far away from her. The scent of sweet alfalfa hay and the enticing lure of the white mare is too much for him. He must find a way to be with her. But will it be worth the risk? Satin and Cinders is a story of courage and determination.

*****

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Happy Spring 🙂 Embrace your inner child by reading a good book! D. L. Finn